There are over 1,600 colleges of education in the United States, hundreds of thousands of teachers, tens of thousands of school administrators, and millions of parents of school-aged children. The Voice of Literacy podcast seeks to keep teachers, parents, principals, policymakers, and journalists informed about the latest research being done in literacy. In collaboration with the editors of RRQ and JLR, Dr. Betsy Baker, Associate Professor of Literacy studies at the University of Missouri, asks authors of research reports published in these journals to explain the following:
- How did you get interested in your topic?
- How does your research inform teachers?
- How does your research inform parents?
- How does your research inform principals?
- How does your research inform policymakers?
- What research do you plan to do next on this topic?
The Voice of Literacy seeks to open the doors to literacy research. The Voice of Literacy seeks to make literacy research readily available and consumable.
Join the online discussions of the podcasts. Create a dialog between researchers, teachers, parents, principals, and policymakers. Stay current with the most recent literacy research. Subscribe to the Voice of Literacy podcast via iTunes, FaceBook, or Twitter.
New episodes are posted 1st and 3rd Mondays from September – April.
See video description, http://www.voiceofliteracy.org/show/about
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uy5z_asVvMY
Contact information
Dr. Elizabeth (Betsy) A. Baker
Professor, Literacy Studies
Office: 573-882-4831
email: BakerE@missouri.edu
303 Townsend Hall
University of Missouri-Columbia
Columbia, MO 65211
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Voice of Literacy

Co-Hosts for Voice of Literacy: Drs. Candace Kuby & Sarah Vander Zanden Drs. Kuby and Vander Zanden began as co-hosts for Voice of Literacy in the fall of 2014. They both share a passion for literacy research and began their collaboration as graduate students. Disseminating current literacy research to teachers, parents, administrators, and policy makers as well as researchers will open up dialogue and generate understanding from many perspectives. Dr. Candace Kuby is an Assistant Professor of Early Childhood Education at the University of Missouri. Her scholarship focuses on: 1) critical, inventive, hybrid, and multimodal literacies and 2) innovative qualitative research methodologies. Candace is the author of Critical literacy in the early childhood classroom: Unpacking histories, unlearning privilege (2013) with Teachers College Press and co-editor of Disrupting Qualitative Inquiry: Possibilities and Tensions in Educational Research (2014) with Peter Lang. Journals in which her scholarship appear include: International Journal for Qualitative Studies in Education; Young Children; Journal of Early Childhood Literacy; and Education, Citizenship, and Social Justice. Dr. Sarah Vander Zanden is an Assistant Professor of Literacy Education at the University of Northern Iowa. Her scholarship focuses on critical literacy, multimodal discourse analysis, literacy teacher education, and formative assessment. Sarah is the Director of the Reading Clinic at UNI and has published articles in Language Arts, Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, and Critical Literacies among others. Voice of Literacy began in 2008 by Dr. Betsy Baker at the University of Missouri. Watch the video to learn of her vision for starting Voice of Literacy. Listen to bi-weekly podcasts of interviews with literacy researchers as they discuss the implications of their research. Join the online discussions of the podcasts. Create a dialog between researchers, teachers, parents, principals, and policymakers. New podcasts are posted on 1st and 3rd Mondays from September - April. In collaboration with the editors of Reading Research Quarterly and the Journal of Literacy Research, Drs. Kuby and Vander Zanden, asks researchers to explain the following: - How did you get interested in your topic? - How does your research help teachers? - How does your research help parents? - How does your research inform policymakers? You are invited to listen to the podcasts and join online discussions in the following ways: - Teachers can use them for professional "reading" and discussion groups - Teachers can pass along pertinent podcasts to parents and principals - Parents can use them to learn what research says about supporting children's reading and writing development - Policymakers can use them to find out policy implications from the most current research - Journalists can use them to understand a topic and report current research findings - Professors can use them to introduce to students a topic and assigned readings - Professors can play the podcasts during class or assign them for homework - Professors can engage students in face-to-face discussions, online discussions for their course (e.g., Blackboard), or let students participate in the online discussions available on the podcast web site - College students can use them to "get up to speed" on current research in reading, writing, and literacy We welcome your feedback. Email Dr. Kuby (kubyc@missouri.edu) or Dr. Vander Zanden (sarah.vanderz@uni.edu) or leave a voice mail (573-882-4831).

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Co-Hosts for Voice of Literacy: Drs. Candace Kuby & Sarah Vander Zanden Drs. Kuby and Vander Zanden began as co-hosts for Voice of Literacy in the fall of 2014. They both share a passion for literacy research and began their collaboration as graduate students. Disseminating current literacy research to teachers, parents, administrators, and policy makers as well as researchers will open up dialogue and generate understanding from many perspectives. Dr. Candace Kuby is an Assistant Professor of Early Childhood Education at the University of Missouri. Her scholarship focuses on: 1) critical, inventive, hybrid, and multimodal literacies and 2) innovative qualitative research methodologies. Candace is the author of Critical literacy in the early childhood classroom: Unpacking histories, unlearning privilege (2013) with Teachers College Press and co-editor of Disrupting Qualitative Inquiry: Possibilities and Tensions in Educational Research (2014) with Peter Lang. Journals in which her scholarship appear include: International Journal for Qualitative Studies in Education; Young Children; Journal of Early Childhood Literacy; and Education, Citizenship, and Social Justice. Dr. Sarah Vander Zanden is an Assistant Professor of Literacy Education at the University of Northern Iowa. Her scholarship focuses on critical literacy, multimodal discourse analysis, literacy teacher education, and formative assessment. Sarah is the Director of the Reading Clinic at UNI and has published articles in Language Arts, Journal of Early Childhood Literacy, and Critical Literacies among others. Voice of Literacy began in 2008 by Dr. Betsy Baker at the University of Missouri. Watch the video to learn of her vision for starting Voice of Literacy. Listen to bi-weekly podcasts of interviews with literacy researchers as they discuss the implications of their research. Join the online discussions of the podcasts. Create a dialog between researchers, teachers, parents, principals, and policymakers. New podcasts are posted on 1st and 3rd Mondays from September - April. In collaboration with the editors of Reading Research Quarterly and the Journal of Literacy Research, Drs. Kuby and Vander Zanden, asks researchers to explain the following: - How did you get interested in your topic? - How does your research help teachers? - How does your research help parents? - How does your research inform policymakers? You are invited to listen to the podcasts and join online discussions in the following ways: - Teachers can use them for professional "reading" and discussion groups - Teachers can pass along pertinent podcasts to parents and principals - Parents can use them to learn what research says about supporting children's reading and writing development - Policymakers can use them to find out policy implications from the most current research - Journalists can use them to understand a topic and report current research findings - Professors can use them to introduce to students a topic and assigned readings - Professors can play the podcasts during class or assign them for homework - Professors can engage students in face-to-face discussions, online discussions for their course (e.g., Blackboard), or let students participate in the online discussions available on the podcast web site - College students can use them to "get up to speed" on current research in reading, writing, and literacy We welcome your feedback. Email Dr. Kuby (kubyc@missouri.edu) or Dr. Vander Zanden (sarah.vanderz@uni.edu) or leave a voice mail (573-882-4831).

http://www.voiceofliteracy.org/redirect/click/73435/0